Pascal Guyon: How I Leveraged Social Media

A Conversation with Philip & Pascal

How can you achieve mastery in your field? How can you make it in the music industry without depending on record labels, publishing deals, managers/agents? How can you become a music entrepreneur?
  1. I made sure that first of all, I was really good at what I was doing so that that meant practicing the piano 10 hours a day, doing videos about it.
  2. Also used a very unique picture on my MySpace page, which was very eye catching as well. But on top of that, I was using software’s that was allowing me to maximize my visibility online. So I was very, very aggressive.
  3. In my early years my parents found me putting the radio on and just using my small instruments and trying to play along with the radio.
  4. In latin music, they said that the piano is a tuned drum.
  5. The goal of that type of music is to make people dance. That’s all.
    The goal is to find a hook that will drive people crazy on the dance floor.
  6. Publishers and labels nowadays don’t actually do that much for you. If you wait on these people, 99% of the time, nothing will happen.
  7. Social media is a great way to connect with people. It made a huge change on your life.
  8. Be insanely good at whatever you do. Not average, but great.
  9. Most of the time, a songwriter is gonna come to me with ideas. But they just have no idea how to make it a reality. This is when I talk to them. I read them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhB1PdOQdGY

Pascal Guyon is a multi Platinum music producer. He’s contributed to three Grammy nominations sold over 15 million records across the world and is a leading influencer in music blockchain technology. Today he joins the show to tell us how social media brought him from a small town of France to producing with renowned top producers in Los Angeles. He is a perfect example of how resourcefulness and mastery leads you to success.
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Mentioned in this Episode:

https://musicoin.org/
Show producer Philip Garcia. Production assistant: Alessa Ray

Pascal Guyon is a multi Platinum music producer. He’s contributed to three Grammy nominations sold over 15 million records across the world and is a leading influencer in music blockchain technology. Welcome to the show. Pascal.

Pascal:

Thank you for having me. Pascal, you’ve achieved tremendous success. And it all started on MySpace. Tell us about that? Well, yeah, it’s actually pretty simple. You know, I was stuck in my French countryside. And I was admiring like music producers from the US, obviously. So I wanted to find a way to work with them, and ideally, to actually move to the US and be part of that. So I only have a minute, you know, so at the time, my space was really hot. That was the hot social media. So I made sure that first of all, I was really good at what I was doing so that that meant practicing the piano 10 hours a day, doing videos about it. So I had actually on my MySpace page videos of me playing salsa music very advanced stuff. So when people see that they’re not used to see that. So that was a good eye catching thing. And also I had tracks. In parallel. I had music tracks, like keep up stuff and things. So people are like, well, he’s doing Salsa is doing hip-hop. I’m like, I want to do both. What’s the problem? So yes, I use that. We also used a very unique picture on my MySpace page, which was very eye catching as well. But on top of that, I was using software’s that was allowing me to maximize my visibility online. So I was very, very aggressive. I was able to message comments to a lot of pages, contact with a lot of people. And that led me to get actually my first really big placement with music stars outside of France.

Philip:

Pascal, talk about your early inspiration, like when you first laid eyes on the piano, what was going on during that time, like you come from a musical background? take us through those first early years.

Pascal:

So the early years were actually my parents found me putting the radio on and just using my is really small instruments and trying to play along with the radio. So that’s how it started. And then I started I wanted to be more serious about it, but like 10 years later, so I was a teenager. So I started to get actually classical piano lessons. And I got my graduations extremely quickly. But that’s really my it’s really studied with radio and me being really attracted sonically to some of the songs and I was like, Oh, that’s a hit. That’s a good one.

Philip:

So classically trained guess. And then later on, you went to like Latin Cuban kind of jazz as well.

Pascal:

Yeah, I was. It was actually all in parallel. I was around 15-16 years old. So I was studying definitely jazz and classical at the same time. So classical music was the regular stuff I had the teacher, I was going to school

So I was studying definitely jazz and classical at the same time. So classical music was the regular stuff I had the teacher, I was going to school
and very regular things . For jazz I was actually going to workshops. So I was traveling so different parts of France. And yeah, I was getting mentored by the top jazz players in Europe basically. And then when I was 20-21, I ended up in Cuba with my mentor, and I ended up actually being invited to play on stage with one of the top bands in Cuba called Bamboleo. One of my mentors was, he was one of the most influential trumpet player and music director in Cuba. And he passed away unfortunately, but that was an incredible time. And certainly my best memory in music wise, definitely. Wow. Yeah. Because Yeah, I mean, music in Cuba. It’s so raw. It’s so true. It’s so intense. The thing is, it’s it’s hard to find that kind of depth in just about music.

Philip:

You know for sure. And with those jazz legend legends that’s dream a come true.

Pascal:

Yeah, absolutely. Well, yeah. And the thing is when you spend just a week with that kind of person, they have huge charisma. They are incredible musicians. You go back home, you’re inspired for years or lifetime. You know, I, I constantly think about that, you know? Yeah, man. Yeah.

Philip:

You know, I remember seeing you on YouTube, smoking the piano. I think there was like a few Latin Yeah, the jams that you were.

Pascal:

Yeah, it’s funny because actually, if you if you check me on YouTube, my advanced salsa piano videos, number six, most viewed, viewed in that style, because you will have the salsa music and then then Timba music, which appeared in the 90s, which is just so sad, but more modern. And for that stuff I did, I really developed a specialty in that and I started to compose and produced in that style of music.

Philip:

Pascale, what’s the most fun piece to play in the channel for you any genre?

Pascal:

I would say latin music, because they said that the piano is a tuned drum. And you saw, like, you know, like, videos of salsa piano is pretty much you’re heating the thing, just like you would play drums, but you have to know where you put the fingers. But that’s, that’s how they see it. So it’s a tuned drum. So you’re really participating in the groove of the songs. The goal of that type of music is to make people dance. That’s all.

Philip:

Yes, that’s Oh, I love that.

Pascal:

You know this start creating the songs by finding the hook and they can spend a lot of time on finding really good hook so there’s some funny examples on YouTube. You see like a two band songwriters that just like ball just like us right now on the seat and thinking about “oh let me find a good hook” and certainly there find something and they are like: “That’s it. That’s the song” and then they build around that. But the goal is to find a hook that will drive people crazy on the dance floor.

Philip:

Nice. That’s it. I love that. I love the energy, especially in Latin music.

Pascal:

Oh yeah. It’s incredible.

Philip:

Pascal fast-forward to say your first week here in the US. Let’s talk about Walter Afanasieff Oh, sure. One of my songwriting heroes and you got a chance to be to, you know, to be involved with Leona Lewis on that track here. I am sure to get back to that story.

Pascal:

Oh, yeah. Wow. Okay. I don’t know how much time you have.
Okay, so, um, you know, I wanted to be in the United States really bad. And the great thing is that there’s some people who had me to move here, not only to move here, but introduce me to some of the most legendary music people. And so yes, I ended up being invited by Walter and Chris ivory, who is a music executive.And my first month in LA was a complete movie because on the first week, Walter was finishing producing a song for Leona Lewis. And he told me, Hey, take it. What would you do? Like. So I took the thing, and I participated to the arrangement. I added some parts here and there. That was somewhat a small contribution, but still my first contribution my first week in the US, that’s exactly how it happened, you know? And then then the second week, that’s when I got introduced to Heavy D, and we’ve made some music, that was my first two weeks in it which which is crazy, because this two albums got like three Grammy nominations.

Philip:

So Oh, my goodness, that’s a dream come true. I mean, these guys are legends. Yeah, Heavy D, Walter Afanasieff
and many more.

Pascal:

Especially, you know, for French guy who grew up between 2001 chicken. It’s pretty good.

Philip:

Wow. You’re a mentor.
To for artists, musicians, songwriters and business owners, you also help them with their social media presence. Talk about how important it is for an artist to have a strong social media presence today.

Pascal:

Sure, well, you know, I just actually start by using my story, because this is how I was able to leave France, a small village in France and come to Hollywood, make it all the way to the Grammys, then to work with some super famous like technology projects and stuff like that. And it’s all based on social media. So the thing is, it’s developing an edge to have maximum visibility, because that’s a problem with artists. There is probably hundreds of thousands of artists who are incredible, but they don’t know how to structure that business or to maximize their visibility. So if nobody knows about you, there’s probably no point that you try to build a career it’s people have to know, right? So for me, I used the I was like, Okay, I’m stuck somewhere, I need to make sure that people know me. Why do I do Why? What’s the hot social media, you know, because if I stay in my village, I will be working deeper within my village, if I get on the internet and put myself out there, while I can connect with pretty much anybody, and that’s really the story of my life, you know? So I from it started on on My Space. And you know, then I switched around to Twitter and Instagram. My following is mostly on Twitter. But basically, it’s all about finding what can work for you. And you see that for some reason, your Instagram is gonna pick her up or Twitter is gonna pick her up and then it’s all about hammering that thing to make the most out of it. You know, and since, you know, that’s something that’s a mistake that artists make, they still think nowadays, they want a manager, they want the publisher they want to label. Well. If you are in that mindset, you will probably probably not do anything in your life.

Because it’s all about actually you building your thing. There’s a famous trader in the UK that says that globally, if you don’t become an entrepreneur, you will never be able financially to retire. globally. I’m not even talking about music. It’s global. So if you just think music, if you want to sign a publishing deal, all that kind of stuff, there’s no money. Why would you do that? And on top of that, publishers don’t that most of the time, don’t actually do that much for you. You know, so there’s really no point if you wait on this people, nothing, I mean, 99% of the time, nothing will happen. The people who had made the most for my career, my music career, we’re not in music.

Interesting. Has Yeah, that’s it. So no people who have made the marks were just extremely brilliant and highly connected. And because I had good relationship with them, thanks to them. They had me and I was able to bypass all the BS or the politics managers permissions had access to pretty much anybody I wanted to and still to this day, you know, so that’s why social media, communicating on your skills, you can do anything you want. The one thing I also say is that people come to a as an actor or musician and thinking that it’s going to be the solution to the problem. And most of the time, it leads to nothing. It’s a failure. I remind people that I was in my village in France and still managed to get songs with some of the biggest stars worldwide. You don’t need to be here to do that. So that’s a wrong kind of mindset. But I did it by using social media, and I keep doing it. And for me, it’s a great way to connect with people you would have never connected with and that can make a huge change on your life. My sponsor for my visa for immigration. were people from Atlanta that I never met, but they liked me and they helped me and that’s it. So that makes all the difference in the world.

Philip:

Wow. Wow. So true. So powerful, and we love that
About you know your your energy and that you’re a people person and that you’re connecting and through social media, so many benefits. Yeah, for everybody we can get, you know, Pascal, there’s, there’s a kid somewhere in this world, you know, in an obscure village that wants to be like you. What advice can you give them?

Pascal:

Two things be insanely good at whatever you do. Not average, but incredibly good. And then communicate means every day you do at least one video and you put it out there. And you study the social media, actually, how can you make the most most out of it? From that point? sky’s the limit.

Philip:

How can the blockchain technology help musicians today?

Pascal:

Yeah, so that’s a big one. So basically, blockchain is just a trust system. And that allows to get rid of third party basically. So the biggest format with music creators is that for a very long time, we had to rely on different people to get our rights basically. And that can be extremely annoying because if you think about it, if you have a song streaming in Japan right now and using the regular things, you’re gonna wait three years to maybe receive sub sub sub sub sub sub pennies for it. So nobody’s happy about it, musicians are not happy about it. Of course, the thing is right now, nowadays, as we speak, you can already use something that will allow you to upload music. And

whenever somebody presses play on the internet, wherever they are in the world, you are paid instantly, much higher per stream than on Spotify equivalent, you can get receive tips for it, you can verify every single transactions and this is happening now. And this is based on blockchain technology. I’m talking specifically about a company called music coin. And I encourage people to use it because it’s free to use. It’s free for people to listen to. So I’m like, and people are like, should I use it? I’m like, it’s free. It’s like, come on, are you kidding me?. And just try and actually, I highly encourage people to put their songs on music on other platforms. And then compare. See, how many streams did you have? How much money did you make? And I’m sorry, done.

Philip:

So where can viewers and musicians go to learn more about this music coin? Is it music? coin.org Music coin.org

Pascal:

Yep, absolutely. Yep. Yeah, I discovered the platform six months ago, I tried it. And for 700 trims. I had like the equivalent of $40 in my wallet. I was like, whoa. So I went deeper in the story. I discovered the founder and how he combined this stuff together to make this happen. And I really like that.

Philip:

I’m excited about this. Yeah. Music coin.org you gotta check it out. Pascal talk about your video game. I understand that music coin is also involved in this as well.

Pascal:

Absolutely. Well, the thing is, once again, as I said before, I love to combine the different things I studied. So I got more into computer science the past year. So I learned I learned a bunch of stuff and making video games is a simple way to apply whatever you learned, basically, right. So but the thing is, at the same time, I was getting involved with music coin, and I was like, Wait a second. I of course, I’m going to put some music in my video game, right. So what I did is I made sure that anybody could play my video game on the computer. So anybody can play the game at EducationalGaming.org it’s just a website. So great. I have my video game on this browser. But what I did is actually take the music player of music coin that I added to this browser page, and on auto play, and I hided the music player, which means that any time that somebody presses the play or load the page that triggers a stream that triggers a payment for me in crypto currency right away. Wow. So that’s why I was like, Hey, this is this is a proof of concept that you can actually use music kind to monetize anything that you have online. Just you can monetize a website, or even like artists, visual artists, they can put their like whatever drawings or whatever on the webpage, put on music and player, create an account on music coin and put some of

that music or friends music. And when people visit that they see the stuff they hear some music, the person is pledged time the page is loaded. It’s great.

Philip:

You’re a multi Platinum music producer. Yeah, what’s your favorite thing about being a music producer.

Pascal:

Is realizing an artist dream. Because basically, most of the time, a songwriter is gonna come to me and they have ideas in their head of the final song, basically. But they just have no idea how to put that. Create that in reality. This is when I talk to them. I read them, but usually you have to 10 minutes. I know. Wow. And that’s it.

Philip:

There’s some magic going on over there.

Pascal:

It’s just it’s just really reading people. Sure. And, yeah, if you’re able to read people, you pretty much able to provide them what they want. And that’s how, like, a few hours later, they leave and happy.

Philip:

You’re gonna have to show me some of those secrets.

Pascal:

Yeah, but it’s just like Actually, it’s more like working with a lot of people around the world and you know, getting used to people does it?..

Philip:

How often do you write songs?

Pascal:

It’s really random, because to me it’s not writing songs is just being creative. So if I’m in the flow state, the creative states one day, it can be more about coding something new, like automated, automating something. I automated turns off my social media reporting this week, for example for some of my clients, but it can be through a video game. So and the next day, it can be a song. And the next day it can be a cooking recipe called the deconstructed sushi. So from his creation, but it doesn’t need to be a song. So how, when you’re creative, you’re creative. It can it can take a lot of your life

because when you’re so creative, it’s just like inspired is just like constantly going on in there. That’s it, but actually breathe well.

Philip:

That’s important. Okay, so what comes first when you’re producing music, drums, bass keyboards, what’s your workflow?

Pascal:

I think it’s a weird question. Because when you’re inspired, it just comes to you. So it you know, it’s almost like when I hear this question; it’s almost like somebody who is not creative trying to do something. So they push themselves or like, like, Oh, I need a template and drums and then there’s no issue an inspire, you hear it in your head, and then you translate that to the computer. You know, I mean, so it can be a noise, it can be whatever it can be somebody making happy noise when they taste good chocolates. It can be anything.

Philip:

Great answer? What kind of music do you listen to for fun?

Pascal:

I don’t.

Philip:

What?

Pascal:

Silence

Philip:

Interesting

Pascal:

That’s what I said to the Uber driver. No AC and silence.

Philip:

This is good to know

Pascal:

So I no way I’m exaggerating. Little bit, but it’s true. It’s true. Because when you spend so much time so much so many years doing it, silence is priceless. You know, I remember going to the desert with some friends. I was amazed by the silence. It’s so nice. Wow. You know? Yeah, so true.

Philip:

We resonate on that. I know what you can say, Oh, yeah, yeah. Okay, so what advice can you give to young artists and producers?

Pascal:

I would say the same thing as actually I said before, it’s like making sure that you are more than good at what you do. And then communicating about it. You know, because the parameters that most most people that I meet, who want to do music work, who are in music, they actually not that educated about what they want to do. So that scares me. I’m like, it was crazy to me. You know, but if you want to do something, why don’t you say you should be passionate about it, but that also means that you’re going to have to practice you have going to have to be good at it. But as you know, we are in a society of instant gratification. So that’s a real problem because people don’t want to do the work basically. And you know, you don’t build a career on nothing. I mean, there’s a lot of scams out there nowadays that people have managed to build career on just confidence. I don’t really you know, I’m not really into that and I don’t really understand how they can be happy with themselves inside. To me, you need to have that. You need to be like an expert. And then I mean, I’m interested in talking to you and discussing with you that because it gets interesting.

Philip:

Wow, Pascal as a kid, what did you get in trouble the most for?

Pascal:

Oh, destroying my Lego boxes

Philip:

Your Lego boxes?

Pascal:

Yes. Because I was playing drums on them.

Philip:

If you were a tree, what kind of tree would you be in why ?

Pascal:

I wouldn’t be a bonsai because they’re very thin.

Philip:

How lucky are you and why?

Pascal:

I’m not. I mean, I can say that. It’s all about cycle to me. So, like anything, you know, does like bad times and good times. People see the plaques and do walls and like they’re like, you know, pretty impressed most of the time. I’m like, You have no idea how many things failed constantly, every day. It’s just unbelievable. But if you’re if you’re okay with failure, well, you know, at some point, you’re gonna catch some. Yeah. So it’s I don’t know. And I’m, I mean, being lucky is just, I think it’s not a real thing. It’s just cycles, and that’s all. Yeah.

Philip:

How would people communicate in a perfect world?

Pascal:

Um, oh, that’s interesting word nowadays. It’s a very interesting question, because nowadays, I’m really blown away by the lack of communication skills that people have, like the way they approach people and on Twitter, I mean, if you are on social media engine, No, I’m, I’m blown away. People don’t know how to introduce themselves. They don’t know how just to say hi to be like polite or stuff. That’s a big deal to me. If you’re not able to do that you’re not gonna be able to interact with high profile people. That means to you like you are very limited in your career, you know, and I see that constantly on social media every day and that most of the time I don’t answer because, like, I I don’t think I have, you know, we’re not gonna get it wrong. There’s no point. I agree. That’s it. Mm hmm.

Philip:

What’s the weirdest Halloween costume for you?

Pascal:

myself. I never get dressed. I don’t care. I like to watch. It’s funny, isn’t it? But yeah,

Philip:

celebrity crush.

Pascal:

I’m Halle Berry. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah.

Philip:

What are your phobias?

Pascal:

I can sometimes feel if really high. Maybe a slight act of heights slight slightly bad just noticed it recently for like hikes we were really really high. So yeah, I’m not sure. Besides that I’m not really sure.

Philip:

will you jump up a plane.

Pascal:

Um, I like to be curious and take risk but not risk. There are two stupid. I think it’s still pretty regular activity. I would probably do it. Yeah, yeah.

Philip:

Favorite song on the piano?

Pascal:

Ravel. Le Tombeau de Couperin

Philip:

I’d love to hear that sometime

Pascal:

I mean, just so people know. Ravel is one of the most famous French composer early 20th century. And he was a master at orchestration and composing. And when you produce orchestration is a big deal. Nobody talks about it and you know, orchestration is really the art of putting the right sounds and melodies all that together and it’s really rare to hear that has this kind of quality nowadays, but Ravel was mastered that and if you hear a piece called Daphnis et Chloe, for example, which is a big choir, an orchestra piece of one hour, this is the most gorgeous piece I’ve ever heard in my life. And when you listen to that, and you go back to listening to current music, you’re like, oh, what happened? It’s like, it sucks. Yeah.

Philip:

If you could make a record with anyone who would it be?

Pascal:

Right now so obviously, I fulfilled a lot of dreams. But since I like, you know, soulful stuff, Erykah Badu would be one of my top. But I think my biggest dream was fulfilled working with Cuban people, because we were actually staying and playing with people who represent their religious music in Cuba. So that’s deep stuff, you know? It’s much more interesting to me than working with any famous pop name. There’s no

question. But yeah, people like Erykah Badu because I mean, she’s in the pop culture. But that’s the truth. It’s so rare nowadays to deal with people who are just like the truth and you take that in your face, and that’s what you have.

Philip:

Describe the color yellow to someone who’s blind.

Pascal:

That’s a stupid question.

Philip:

I know I know

Pascal:

I would say, you know, when you eat a banana, well, that’s kind of yellow outside. That’s not described, but it’s funny.

Philip:

favorite work of art.

Pascal:

Um, you mean like art piece?

Philip:

Sure.

Pascal:

I would say once again. If you put music into it, I would say definitely send By rather.

Philip:

What’s your favorite board game?

Pascal:

It’s not that funny.
Yeah, I don’t think I’m a big fan of board game.

Philip:

What’s funny for you

Pascal:

Messing with people’s mind one on one? I like playing ping pong rocks.

Philip:

Yes.
Yeah. I love that. Yes.

Pascal:

Because most people, they give up so quickly. And I love because I very often I’m losing and I come back all the time because I play for the pleasure of playing. And just Yeah, kind of messing with. The person in front of you is just really enjoyable.

Philip:

play tennis and ping pong. How long have you been playing both?

Pascal:

Oh, I mean, I played decently but nothing really good. Since I’m a kid, yeah, regular activity.

Philip:

What’s the weirdest music making tip that you can give to us?

Pascal:

Go to the restroom before starting to produce. I’m serious. So my, it’s actually something that happened again and again and again. If I meet some somebody for the first time here, they come here, we talk for 10 minutes, then I got them. I go to the restroom, do whatever I have to do. And I hear something in my head. I come back here for even the computer 30 minutes later, it’s usually finished. Now I mean, done in the the idea is that that that’s it.

Philip:

dude. I’m doing that from from here on out.

Pascal:

But I don’t know it’s different for everybody. It’s just something that when I go in the in the bathroom or whatever, it’s just shoot. I download some stuff from I don’t know where. So that’s it.

Philip:

I wonder what you’re doing in the restroom?

Pascal:

I don’t know.

Philip:

You were an early user of my space. You’ve built a successful massive following on Twitter and you’re an early adopter of the blockchain technology. What’s next,

Pascal:

And more computer science for me, but specifically combining computer science with my knowledge in finance and in music and other things and visual in gaming and teaching people at the same time. So that’s really what I want to do is combine all that so that everybody’s happy. It’s interesting for everybody. So, you know, I did a basic game in two dimension. You know, it’s a basic Atari thing, nothing crazy about it, but there’s some features that are unique because it’s gonna blend combined to blockchain. I’m getting paid instantly when people play the game, they hear my music, all that good stuff. So I will keep building on top of it. But obviously, I would certainly start to build more things in like 3d. I just started to mess a tiny bit with Unity. So we see there’s the different areas I want to study next are definitely more like 3d. Gaming AI, which I want to use both for my finance activities and different things, and studying blockchain technology as well, I would love to be able to help the different companies I work with like music, Khan or even Hyperloop transportation technologies. More on this side, I just need to keep educating myself. And then hopefully we’ll be able to contribute more on the technical side as well. That’s definitely my goal. The interesting things that people I think would like to know is that YouTube and Twitter are one of the main things you want to use to get indexed by Google. So when you create content or whatever, you need to make sure that it’s on Twitter, it’s on YouTube, that kind of stuff. So if you Google my name, you’ll find YouTube videos and Twitter right away, actually.

Philip:

So what’s the biggest misconception about Cuba?

Pascal:

Well, I think the one thing that people know about Cuba is its music and a bunch of other stuff, but music is a big deal. And the funny thing is you know, people see it as a very happy simple thing that you can enjoy. Body, whatever the depth of that music is unbelievable because it’s a heritage of African music, European harmony, mixed with jazz and even mixed in in the way they mix songs very influenced by bands like

African fire, r&b and or modern American music as well. So there’s a lot going on, it’s very rich in making, creating that kind of music. But then the beauty about it is that people who don’t know anything about music, think it’s simple. They’re just partying and enjoying it and that’s it. But I can tell you that the knowledge and the love or quality of the musicians there is like nothing I’ve ever seen. Nothing I remember going to a rehearsal. One day a friend of the top music director of Cuba. And it’s like, I would have like, taken the plane in the face. And I was highly educated by music at that time already. But it was so intense. That to meet I was like, holy cow. I’ve never seen that ever, you know. So and and I got mentored by top jazz players like from different parts of the world. But there’s something there that is like there’s a Yeah, there’s like, something brewing there. That is unbelievable.

Philip:

Yeah. You’re a multi Platinum music producer, talk to us about the collaboration with Anthony Hamilton.

Pascal:

So my second week in the United States in Los Angeles, I was working with Walter A in Westlake studios, and Chris ivory music executive introduced me to heavily hip hop legend producer rapper The funny thing is that I barely knew who he was at the time. But we started we took an afternoon and we made two tracks together and and I left for France A few weeks later and then I got a call saying that what we did was placed to Anthony Hamilton, for a French countryside guy, there was a pretty big dealand it’s it’s a very classy artists. I mean, you know, in the pop world nowadays you can get placements with like very famous pop artists does a lot to me who are I wouldn’t even be that proud to have trust with them because music was not very interesting to me. But artists like Anthony Hamilton who really represents some music style, that have like really just quality music wise, you know, and you know, very, very happy about it and you know, very proud of it, for sure.

Philip:

Wow. Pascal talk about this for a minute. Upcoming producers who’ve got their game going on, they got their tracks, how can they start placing music with artists and TV and film?

Pascal:

So it’s going to be interesting as well. Because when I do conferences, speaking gigs about, it’s disturbing. Usually I push artists to think different. Because it’s always the same story. You know, people create tracks, and they’re like, Oh, I’m gonna talk to a manager, I’m gonna talk to a publisher or whatever. And you know, to place the thing,

and I’m like, No. Why? Because you have another 100,000 people doing the same thing. So why would you do the same thing as another hundred thousand people? There’s no point to me. I want to be the only one doing something in the different soccer. So to me, I’m like, I get out of the circle. This is not possible. There’s too many people doing the same things. And the music is not even selected on quality is just whatever and politics. So to me, I’m like, No, let me get out of this circle. I’m still gonna make music but I’m gonna change circle. For example, I can be around like great entrepreneurs doing amazing things and be like, and be their one music guy. And that’s it. And you have, if you have good social skills, and you understand technology, you’re able to understand and interact with these people. You can end up having people, some of these people are helping you and dragging you business. And you don’t have to fight with the other tons of people doing the same thing as you because you’re in a circle where you’re the one you look the go to guy basically, you know, well, that’s how I do it, you know, and that’s how, you know, I bypassed managers, publishers, that’s how I got the biggest name in music. My first two weeks in LA, you know, people are like, how did you do that? I’m like, well, not through music people.

Philip:

And Pascal, you also have an online group that helps and you’re doing mentoring for artists and producers. Where can we go to learn more about that

Pascal:

pascalguyon.org just my website, you’ll find it easily online. There’s a free mentoring program for music artists. There’s also a bunch of other conferences that are listed there that you can purchase for like peanuts. The sad thing is, most music artists do not have a business mind and are not really doing the job to constantly being to learn constantly. So my mentoring my imagery, it’s completely free. And I have all the infos of everything I did all the strategies is there. That’s probably less than 3% of the people who signed up for it, we actually use it. It’s always like that. But more globally, actually. It’s very well known that when people are signing up for things they want to learn, they actually never open the thing, even if they paid for it. It’s just known. It’s just the way sure it’s just people, you know, yeah. So I’m just saying that, you know, if somebody wants to actually done something and do it Something about really improving the career. You know, everything is there for free. So it’s up to them to grab them. You know, that’s it.

Philip:

Thanks so much for your inspiration and a great conversation today and you gotta check him out at pascalguyon.org
This is Philip at vision quest sound and we’ll see you soon.
Awesome

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